Joaquin Becoming a Powerful Hurricane – Increasing Risk to the United States

   Posted by Levi at 12:05am on October 1, 2015


15 comments

   

Comments

  • Carol Mahler says:

    Levi, thanks for another informative, professional video update. I repost this to my page since I have friends/relatives from the Carolinas to Maine Always appreciate your presentations!

  • Anonymous says:

    Man made. I wont harrp on it

  • Greg says:

    Levi I have been watching your vidieos for several years you are good.Levi I have a question?I live in mobile Alabama mets keep saying that the gulf is shut down the rest of hurricane season what do you think?

    • Levi says:

      Thanks Greg. The hurricane season is not yet over. The Gulf of Mexico has had hurricanes as late as November in the past. Tropical activity in El Nino seasons like this one is usually lower than normal in the fall, but that is not a guarantee.

  • Mark says:

    Brilliant video, Levi!
    This season my boat is near Beaufort North Carolina. We were hit last year by Gonzali in St Martin so i really don’t want to be dusted up again.
    So please send it off on the Euro track into the mid atl:)

  • natureobs says:

    Thanks so much Levi. Well done. I am always eager to watch you videos, I just don’t always have time to comment.

    I hope school is going well for you. I can’t imagine it going otherwise.

  • Logan says:

    Thank you as always for the best forcast out there. I’ve been following you very close for many years I live in NJ and am an avid surfer. My question is why does this storm have a huge amount of swell associated with it? I’ve never have seen swell models with a large purple/white blob in the middle of the eastern seaboard.

  • Reid says:

    Well I just learned something new. A “cutoff” low and a hurricane will try to rotate around one another.

    Thanks for that “tidbit,” Mr. Cowan.

    I guess if the remnants of Ida were stronger, we’d have more to worry about.

    I also think at the time you were making this video, the storm took a jog to the south. I’ve been watching the microwave imagery here, http://tropic.ssec.wisc.edu/real-time/mimic-tc/2015_11L/webManager/mainpage.html and you can see that when it transitioned from a TS to a hurricane, it took that jog south, or appeared to.

  • JD says:

    Levi – have enjoyed watching your videos here and reading your posts over at Dr. Masters site for quite a while now.

    Now that we’re ~18 hours from your latest video, it appears that Joaquin has intensified into a major sooner than initially anticipated. It isn’t necessarily a large system, but it certainly isn’t small –

    Would a deeper, stronger low “feel” the trough quicker, regardless of size? Wouldn’t that accelerate Joaquin’s path north, and then due to it’s negative tilt, east? Seems to me the deeper and stronger Joaquin becomes, the greater the chance of a US hit.

    Look forward to your next update on this possibly historic storm.

  • Joe says:

    I see this as a major hurricane impacting portions of New York, and New Jersey States. This will not be a catastrophic rain maker if nothing else.

  • Joe says:

    (Correction)

    I see this as a major hurricane impacting portions of New York, and New Jersey States. This will be a catastrophic rain maker if nothing else.

  • Reid says:

    I’m a little disappointed that we haven’t seen an update here in 24 hours, given the enormity of the situation.

    Perhaps ” tidbits,” is a fitting name for this site. Perhap is a fitting name for this place, more like tiny scraps, really.

  • nhl 17 says:

    Many thanks! It is definitely an impressive web page!.
    nhl 17 http://wanc.org.za/forum/topic/826

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